toastmasters CC in 2 minutes

8 09 2008

These short tutorials give you some guidance as to the requirements for the speech assignments in the Competent Communicator manual.

1 – The Icebreaker

Purpose: To introduce yourself to your fellow club members and share information about yourself of interest.
Timing: 4-6 minutes

What is this talk about?
The general subject of this talk is YOU!  Share personal experiences of significance to you.

What do I talk about?
Select three or four interesting aspects about yourself which will provide an insight and understanding of you as an individual.  You might include your birthplace, education or family, previous occupations, ambitions, hobbies, sports, or travel experiences.

How do I structure my talk?
Once you have decided what you will talk about, try to create an interesting opening that captures everyone’s attention. Then work out how to finish your speech with a suitable conclusion.  Finally fill in the body of the speech with the three or four points you want to make, expanding on them by using examples, stories, or anecdotes.

Should I use any notes?
Yes, you can use notes if you think you will need them.  But remember, you are speaking about yourself, not reading your life history.  You could write your main points on small card to refer to when you need to.

How much practice should I do?
You need to do as much practice as you think is needed so that you are familiar enough with your talk that it sounds spontaneous and natural. Rather than thinking of it as “making a speech”, think of it as a talk before a group of friends, sharing information of interest.

Will I be marked on my speech?
No, you will not be marked or graded.  Everyone will offer you feedback on how you did, and complete a personal written evaluation in your manual for you to take away and keep.  You can use the evaluation sheet as a guide to things you did well, and things you could improve on or change for next time.

Should my talk have a title?
Yes, try to think of an interesting title for your talk that conveys a hint of what you are going to talk about and sets the scene for your talk.  Before you speak, you will be introduced by name, using the title you have given.

Evaluation: Your evaluator will be looking for your strong points, whether they got to know you as a person, were you adequately prepared, did you speak clearly, did your speech have a definite opening, body and conclusion, and will offer specific suggestions to help you improve for next time.


2 – Organise Your Speech

Purpose: To select an appropriate outline which allows listeners to easily follow and understand your speech
Time: 5-7 minutes

Why should my speech be well organised?
A well organised speech will have several benefits for the audience.  They are easier to understand, and remember, and are more credible and enjoyable.

Where should I find a topic?
You can find a topic just about anywhere – look in newspapers and magazines, on the internet; you could use a personal experience, or talk about your hobby or sport.

What should my opening be like?
You could open your speech with a startling question, or challenging statement, use a quote or illustration, display an object or picture, or any attention-getting technique that ties in with your subject.

How do I develop the body of my speech?
The body of your speech is where you present your main facts or ideas in a logical format.  You can include statistics, stories, anecdotes, visual aids and facts to support your views.

How do I conclude my speech?
Your conclusion is your final opprtunity to convey your message and main points in a manner that will help the audience remember them.  It should reinforce your ideas and leave your listeners with a lasting impression.

Evaluation: Your evaluator will be looking at the speech value, your preparation and organisation, your opening, body and conclusion, and how the transitions between each part of the speech were handled.


3 – Get to the Point

Purpose: To select an appropriate outline which allows listeners to easily follow and understand your speech
Time: 5-7 minutes

What is a suitable subject for this talk?
Choose a subject of current general interest.  Your purpose could be to inform, persuade, entertain or inspire your audience.

How do I focus my speech?

Try to be specific and keep to one topic, being clear and concise.  Decide the main points, facts and ideas and work out an outline that will achieve your purpose with an opening, a body and a conclusion.

How do I speak with confidence?
Knowing your topic well, and having a speech organised effectively to achieve your purpose, will help you speak confidently.  By being enthusiastic and convincing, you’ll have more credibility with the audience.

Evaluation: Your evaluator will be evaluating your speech’s purpose, organisation, main points and supporting material, checking how confident and sincere you appeared.


4 – How to Say It

Purpose: To select just the right words and sentence structure to communicate your ideas clearly and accurately
Time: 5-7 minutes

Because your listeners don’t have the opportunity to study and reflect on your words as they do when reading, you must speak informally, using familiar words and concepts that everyone can understand. This helps keep your audience interested, attentive and receptive to your ideas.

Here’s a few pointers about ‘words’ for this assignment:

Use short words
Instead of the word ‘facilitate’, say ‘make easy’, or ‘require’, use ‘need’.  One syllable words are the most effective and memorable for your listeners.

Avoid using jargon
Try not to use specialised words or jargon unless you are speaking to people who know what they are.  If you do need to use jargon, make sure you explain the meaning of the word/s carefully.

Use vivid words
By using what Toastmasters call ‘word pictures’, you can paint pictures for your audience, stirring their imagination so that they can “see” what you mean.

Use less words
Try to say a lot in as few words as possible.

Use short sentences
Short sentences have power and impact, and are memorable.

Use Active Voice
Use the active voice, clearly stating who does what.  The active voice uses fewer words, is easier to follow and sounds more vigorous and interesting.

Evaluation: Your evaluator will be answering the following questions:

  • Was the speech topic appropriate?
  • Did you use words what were simple, short and clear?
  • Did you use vivid words that created mental pictures?
  • Were your sentences short, simple and understandable?
  • Did you avoid using jargon and unnecessary words?

5 – Your Body Speaks

Purpose: To use stance, movement, gestures, facial expressions and eye contact to express your message and achieve your speech’s purpose, and to make your body language smooth and natural
Time: 5-7 minutes

What is body language?
Body language is your stance, gestures, facial expressions, eye contact, and body movements which help to illustrate and emphasise the points you are making.  Body movements dramatically increase the effectiveness of your speech giving the audience visual cues about what you mean.

What sort of movements could be used?
You may want to dramatise a specific point, such as describing how to thow and catch a ball or some other sporting activity.  You may want to demonstrate how big something was, or how small, using your arms.  Whatever movements you use, they should always be purposeful and add to your speech in some way.

What sort of gestures could be used?
Gestures involve the use of your hands and arms to illustrate your words.

  • Clenched fists show power
  • Open palms mean giving
  • A forefinger pointing upwards means pay attention
  • Folding your arms means strength and determination
  • Clasping your hands in front of your chest conveys unity

What sort of facial expressions could be used?
An audience takes many cues about how they are supposed to react or feel from your facial expressions.  Your eyes, eye movement, eyebrows and mouth play vital roles in showing sadness, fear, happiness, anger, frustration, nervousness, excitement, boredom, interest, wonder, exhaustion, etc.  Your facial expressions must be consistent with the feelings or information you are trying to convey.

What about eye contact?
Look directly at your audience, not around the fringes of the room. Occasionally focus on one or two people when making a specific point.

For this speech project, you need to find a topic that requires the use of body movement, gestures, facial expressions and eye contact to effectively make a point, matching your gestures to your words so that it looks natural and spontaneous.

How will I be evaluated?
Your evaluator will be focussing on your delivery style, especially your posture, gestures, body movements, eye contact, and facial expressions.  They will also be commenting on whether your chosen topic, preparation and organisation was suitable for this particular assignment.


5 – Vocal Variety

Purpose: To explore the use of voice volume, pitch, rate, and quality as assets to your speaking, and to achieve a pleasing natural voice quality.
Timing: 5-7 minutes

The primary link between you and your audience is your voice.  Apparently we are five times as likely to be influenced by voice than by spoken words as we listen to a speaker.  Thus, we are more influenced by how a speaker talks than by what a speaker actually says.

What are the qualities of a good speaking voice?

  1. Volume – vary your voice volume to add emphasis or dramatic impact
  2. Pitch – vary the pitch of your voice to convey emotion and conviction
  3. Rate – vary your speaking rate to reflect mood changes
  4. Quality – convey friendliness, confidence, and relax

What are the characteristics of a good speaking voice?

  1. Pleasant tone
  2. Natural, and sincere, reflects personality
  3. Strength and vitality
  4. Uses shades of meaning, not monotonous or emotionless
  5. Easily heard, good volume, clear articulation

What sort of topic would suit this assignment?
Choose a topic that lends itself easily to voice variety, perhaps with a display of emotion. It could be of narrative or descriptive topic that allows you to use different tones of voice or imitations.  You could tell a story which involves several characters, or describe an event or occasion where you can use your voice to bring the scene to life for the audience.

Evaluation: Your evaluator will be looking to see if you used a topic which enabled you to use voice volume, speaking rate, pitch, tone, vitality, variety, expressiveness, organisation and body language.


7 – Research Your Topic

Purpose: To collect information about your topic from a variety of sources, and to support your pointswith facts, examples and illustrations gathered from your research
Time: 5-7 minutes

Where can I find resources for this speech?
The best place to look is on the internet.  You can also look through books, newspapers and magazines, and consult published sources such as Government official documents.  Visit your local library for ideas.

What should I do when researching?
You should keep an open mind when researching your topic, looking for ideas or angles on your topic which may be of interest.  Use several different sources and makes notes on what you find of interest.

How should I keep my topic interesting?
It is important to keep your speech interesting but also pitched at the right level for your audience.  Don’t be too simplistic or too complicated.  Think about the needs of your audience and what the message is you are trying to convey.

Evaluation: Your evaluator will be looking at the type of information you collected and how it was conveyed to your audience, and whether your speech’s purpose was met by effective organisation, use of body language and vocal variety.


8 – Get Comfortable with Visual Aids

Purpose: To select appropriate visual aids and use them effectively
Time: 5-7 minutes

What type of visual aids can I use?
There are a number of different types of visual aids which you can use:

  • Computer-based visuals such as a Powerpoint slideshow
  • Overhead transparencies
  • Flip charts
  • Whiteboards
  • Props

When should I use my visuals?
You should use your visual aids:

  • To reinforce a main point
  • To enhance understanding/remembrance of complex material
  • To save time

How should I prepare my visuals?
You need to think about your visuals to that they are:

  • visible to the audience
  • limited to only one main thought or point at a time
  • are easily read with one font type and graphics
  • colourful and interesting

How should I display my visuals?
Here are some tips for displaying your visuals:

  • Display your visual just before you are ready to talk about it
  • Try to maintain eye contact with your audience
  • Display your visual long enough for the audience to see and understand it
  • Try not to write as you are speaking, and don’t block the visual from the audience’s view
  • Rehearse your use of the visuals so you can avoid any problems

Evaluation: Your evaluator will be evaluating your performance using visual aids, in particular checking that the visual aids were appropriate for the speech and message, they helped the audience understand your message, were clearly visible and used with confidence.  The evaluator will also make recommendations for future speeches which use visual aids.

Here’s what other Toastmasters have used for props in their speeches:

I have used a baseball cap. The one I used was Nike cap and it said, “Just Do It.” I used it for an inspirational type of speech.

I used a handphone as a prop. I used it more for a humorous type of speech, talking about the various types of handphone users, and added the element of surprise when I pulled it out from my pocket, and later I sprang another surprise pulling out an ear-piece.

Some examples from the mantelpiece in my lounge for possible props:

  • Trophies – possible subjects include winning, motivation, success,
    Toastmasters, electroplating.
  • Small hand made ceramic figure – possible subjects include creativity,
    gifts, love, art, collecting.
  • Candle holders – possible subjects include Edison, light, history, time.
  • Swiss cow bell – possible subjects include travel, sound, signalling,
    Swiss chocolate.
  • African carving – possible subjects include travel, mysticism, tribal
    lore, collecting, cultures, history.

Within a few paces I can find the following ideas for props:

  • Wine rack – possible subjects include viticulture, wine tasting,
    history, food and drink.
  • Antique microscope – possible subjects include the world of the very
    small, history, optics, collecting, metallurgy.
  • Collection of rock samples – possible subjects include geology,
    mineralogy, history, travel, collecting.
  • Paintings – possible subjects include collecting, decorating,
    creativity, art.
  • Telephone – possible subjects include technology, change, communication,
    lifestyle.
  • Books – huge range of possible subjects include reading, education,
    philosophy, writing, stories, collecting.

Most of these items has its own story and a reason why it’s there in my home.

I talked about urban legends and junk e-mail, and used a can of Spam as a prop. For a speech about my stint as an owner of a cosmetics store, I used a makeup sponge (foam wedge) and an eye shadow applicator. For a speech on how to do effective electronic presentations, I used a laptop and a projector (and juggling balls!)

Pick something as the subject that you really need to have the audience see, feel, touch, hear etc. If you give a talk about, say, dog obedience training, you could have a trophy as a prop but it would be much better to have the Dog that Won the Trophy and let the audience really see what you are talking about!

If you meet in a place where you can have a dog, that is a really great idea. A member of our club brought in his Alaskan Malamute as a prop for a speech about the dogs.

The first time I did this assignment it was right around the time that my 14 year old son and I were taking SCUBA lessons. So I took in a tank, with regulator and depth gauge attached of course, and talked about SCUBA diving … while demonstrating some of the practical tips.

I did a speech about how data can be left on your computer when you get rid of it. I used file folders to show how deleting a file just removes the label from the file and not its contents. I also showed how the folders are a fixed size and the computer will write something in the empty space.

We had one member do a speech that had multiple characters in it. He switched hats to indicate which person was talking.

We had a member who did a speech on choosing local foods and organic foods.  She talked about the importance of buying local foods, and brought in fruit from the local market. At the end of the speech she gave everyone a sample.

My wife and I raise Miniature Horses and I gave a speech on our horses and what can be done with them. I demonstrated their size with a couple of yard sticks showing large horses and finally our little ones. I used several horseshoes to illustrate different size hooves. I had some teeth samples and used them. As a grand finale, I had a radio in my pocket which I used to signal my wife outside. You guessed it!!  She walked in with one of our Miniature stallions and everyone went wild!!!


9 – Persuade with Power

Purpose: To persuade your audience to accept your proposal or point of view
Timing: 5-7 minutes

Developing your persuasive skills is one of the best investments in time and effort you can possibly make. In this assignment you will be focussing on getting your audience accept your point of view.  There are three components of any persuasive argument: the persuader, the purpose of your message, and the listener/s.

You are the Persuader

  • Knowledge: You must be qualified to discuss the subject, and offer evidence to support your position.
  • Reputation: Make sure your audience is familiar with your qualifications to speak on the subject.
  • Sincerity: Make it clear you have the audience’s interests in mind.
  • Delivery: Speak with confidence and self-assurance, using direct eye contact at all times.

The Purpose of your Message
What is the goal of your speech?  To get the audience to act, to change their attitudes or beliefs, to inspire or arouse them?  To be persuasive, you must convince your listeners that your interests coincide with theirs.

The Audience
Have you analysed your audience?  Do you know what their attitudes are towards your subject?  Do you know how much they already know about your subject?  Will they be favourable towards your ideas?

The audience agrees – you’ll reinforce and strengthen their agreement
The audience is neutral – you’ll need to convince them that the subject is important to them
The audience opposes – you need to get your audience to at least recognise the merits of your position and reconsider their own views

Organising your speech
Here’s a five-step approach you can use for your persuasive speech:

  1. Attention – begin with an attention-grabbing opening
  2. Need – establish the need or problem and why it’s important
  3. Satisfaction – give solutions to the need or problem
  4. Visualisation – show how the solutions will improve the situation
  5. Action – turn agreement and commitment into positive action

Evaluation:
Your evaluator needs to understand what you are trying to achieve with this speech, so make sure you have spoken to him/her beforehand.  The evaluation will focus on a number of questions, especially the following:

  • Did your opening capture the audience’s attention?
  • Did you present factual support for your arguments?
  • Did your conclusion call for action?
  • Did you prepare sufficiently, and speak with directness and conviction?

10 – Inspire your Audience

Purpose: To inspire your audience on a subject that has deep meaning
Timing: 8-10 minutes

This is it! The last speech in the manual!  By completing this speech, you’ll receive your Competent Communicator Award.  Whew!  It’s been a long time coming, so you need to find a topic for this speech that will be inspirational and uplifting both to yourself and your audience.

What are the qualities of an inspirational speech?
Your speech should contain illustrations and thoughts that capture the audience’s imagination, and breathe life into your talk. You’ll uplift and inspire your audience to achieve great things.

For this occasion, you need to be:

  • Confident
  • Forceful
  • Positive
  • Definite

This speech calls for dignity, excellence of style, and an emotional rapport with your audience.

Evaluation:
Your evaluator will be expecting you to choose a subject that expresses the highest feelings of the audience.  You’ll be using examples and illustrations to bring the audience up to a higher level of belief and achievement.  This is one of the most enjoyable speeches in the manual, and your evaluator will be looking to see if you used all the skills you have learnt through the previous nine speech assignments to become a Competent Communicator.  Congratulations!

(from the toastmasters site)





tm schedule…

21 08 2008

Toastmasters schedule

Saturday 23-08-2008 9:00am          Toastmasters Leadership Institute (TLI)
.                                                        at IEU Sby

Saturday 30-08-2008 4:00pm          IEU tm Humorous and Evaluation (H&E)
.                                                        contest

Saturday 13-09-2008 3:30-5:30pm tm Meeting at IEU

Saturday 27-09-2008 3:30-5:30pm tm Meeting at IEU

Saturday 18-10-2008                       Area I4 Contest (H&E) at IEU Sby

Johannes
tm president





Leadership Training on sat 23 Aug 2008

12 08 2008
Dear Area I-4 Gov, Club Officers, current and future Toastmasters,
We would like to extend an invitation to our
|
Leadership Training
on sat 23 Aug 2008 at 9.00 – 14.30
at the IEU (Indonesian European University)
Jl Raya Dukuh Kupang 157, Surabaya.
As required by Toastmasters International that each club should send minimum 4 club officers to attend the training. Meanwhile this training is also improtant to other members either current or future to achieve their leadership goal.
There will be one trainer from Malaysia, 3 trainers from Jakarta and 2 trainers from Surabaya. Please find the program on the attachment. There will be charge for non exco, Rp 20,000 and lunch will be provided.
We would appreciate if you could participate in this important event.
|
Rgds
Arlan Setiawan DTM
Division I Governor




toastmasters member karaoke…

9 08 2008

Wah…. This is a wonderful Saturday that most member having fun karaoke

but sadly I can’t come…. So share your story, pics here..

Johan





general

9 08 2008

How to post?

Click any list in the RECENT POST or RECENT COMMENT

than do the posting…






membership info…

9 08 2008

Q. Is there any handout in the toastmasters club?

A. For all the members will get the original manual (full color printer/not fotocopy). directly mailed from USA. Every month they also get the toastmasters magazine (full color).

Johan





tm trick – how to grab audience’s attention

8 08 2008

Q. How to grab audience’s attention while giving speech?

For me,

  • play music instruments
  • show attractive slide (beautiful girl)

Johan








Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.